Sunday, 19 February 2017

‘Getting noticed’ – much more than a mere commercial requirement!

The most important part of the outcome of a design process is its ability to stand out amidst the work of contemporaries. If I were to connect this concept of “standing out” to my area of work, namely visibility in trade shows, it becomes very clear that it becomes the raison d etre of our professional endeavours.

Exhibitors have a time frame of about 50 hours on the trade show floor to differentiate their product and make it stand out from amongst all the competitors. Bear in mind that the trade show in a particular source market happens once in a year. This translates to just one criterion: what should he do to get noticed in these 50 hours that will continue to ensure a recall value for the rest of the 8710 hours in the year?

The process of getting noticed can be simplified and divided into two parts: preparation and execution.

PREPARATION: The essential element in preparation is to identify one’s business with respects to abilities and goals. Every appearance in a trade show can act both as deterrent or a catalyst for one business depending on the preparation. Am I ready for this market? Will I be able to accommodate more business? What am I going to this show for? Do I really need to go there or is my motivation to attend merely that my peers are participating?

Once these questions get an honest answer, then comes a bigger question - which shows to attend? Trade show business was invented as an extension of the traditional market place with a primary aim to sell commodities to a buyer. Over the years when countries started to specialize in knowledge and technology at varying levels due to many reasons like economy, education, population, demography etc., the knowledge and technology also became commodities to be sold for money or equivalent. Since these required specialized environments Trade Shows were born and today occupy the most important part of the marketing strategy bouquet of any company.  But the trade shows are varying in their deliveries too. Some tradeshows use a walk-in format while others are focussed on business appointment.
The exhibitor has to decide on participation or not based on what his product meant for. Most shows promise both walks ins and fixed appointments as getting only the business appointments for all is a challenging option for the organizer. It can be a promise but nearly impossible to deliver.

In our E-nabled times, the preparation begins many days before the show. An exhibitor can check out his competition on the show floor or assess the probability of the buyers coming to the show. Then he can start reaching out to buyers through appointment diaries most show organizers now put out. He can create his arrival campaign through social media and publicize his offerings many days before the show physically takes off on the ground.

I would write on the topic of EXECUTION in my next post…. Watch this space…..


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